Teaching American History Project Lesson
  Mike Patterson

Author: Mike Patterson 

Unit Title: Civil War

Lesson Title: Emancipation Proclamation

Subject: US History

Level: 11th Grade

Length of Lesson: Three 55-minute traditional class periods

 

Introduction:
Students will investigate the Emancipation Proclamation including the draft, final version, southern response and how the Proclamation affected the slave population. This lesson will use copies of the draft, final document, political cartoons, newspaper accounts and WPA interviews with former slaves.

 

Objectives:
Students will understand the impact of the Emancipation Proclamation on the South and the slave population.
Study of the evolution of the document and hearing first hand accounts of the issue will provide a relationship between action and consequence using primary and secondary source materials.

 

Nevada State Content Standards

History Standard 6.0: 1700 to 1865: Students understand the people, events, ideas, and conflicts that led to the creation of new nations and distinctive cultures.
Benchmark 6.12.21 Describe the causes, key people, events, and outcome of the Civil War, including Emancipation Proclamation.

 

In-class Student Activities:

Day 1

  • Students will use a dictionary to understand terms: emancipation proclamation, servitude, rebellion 5 min.)
  • Teacher will preview the Emancipation Proclamation discussing the context of why the Proclamation was issued - Great Britain, support for the war, response to public opinion (10 min).
  • Students will read the final copy of the Emancipation Proclamation and analyze and underline what they perceive as the important statements. (10 min) .
  • Students will read the draft copy of the Emancipation Proclamation analyze and underline changes that were made in the final copy (10 min).
  • Students will work in groups to discuss the changes and evaluate why these changes may have been made (10 min).
  • Students will share one of their findings with the entire class and write these on the board (5 min).
  • Teacher will summarize what students have discovered in the two documents (2 min).

Day 2

  • Students will use a dictionary to understand terms: overseer, politics, master, slave (10 min).
  • Teacher will discuss the WPA Federal Writers Project giving background on how the oral histories of former slaves were collected (5 min).
  • Students will listen to one audio recording of from the Writers Project and discuss their impressions of it (2 min). http://memory.loc.gov/afc/afcqltbr/audio/a003/
  • Students will listen to Remembering Slavery, Chapter 5: James Earl Jones reading the words of Robert Glenn (3 min).
  • Students will work in groups with copies of two or three transcriptions of the WPA oral histories (with photos of the former slaves) and create Venn diagrams comparing the stories (20 min).
  • Students will share with class their impressions with the class (5 min).
  • Teacher will summarize (2 min).

Day 3

  • Students will evaluate Confederate cartoon for its meaning in regard to the Emancipation Proclamation. Turn in for credit (3 min).
  • Students will evaluate Northern cartoon for its meaning in regard to the Emancipation Proclamation. Turn in for credit (3 min).
  • Teacher will remind students that this issue became a major factor in thereasons for fighting the Civil War (2 min).
  • Students will read and discuss in groups the minutes of the Confederate Congress regarding the Emancipation Proclamation. (April 17, 1863 pg 377 & 378 and May 1, 1863 pg 486 & 487) (15 min).
  • Students will write a response to the Confederate Congress in the form of an editorial (20 min).
  • One student group will share her/his editorial with the class, other groups will summarize their editorial response (8 min).
  • Teacher will review the responses (1 min).

 

Extended Enrichment Activities:

Day 1

  • Students will write a one-page paper on how the Emancipation Proclamation (alternatively, “how emancipation might”) might have been extended and why they believe it was restricted to include only the areas in rebellion against the Union.
  • Students will understand that at the time the Emancipation Proclamation was issued, no slaves were actually freed.

Day 2

  • Students will use the American Memory “Born in Slavery” website - http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/snhtml/snhome.html or Remembering Slavery, African Americans Talk About Their Personal Experiences of Slavery and Emancipation, Radio Documentary and companion book to research at least one oral history story and compare those memories to the stories shared in class.

Day 3

  • Bonus work research how slavery ended in the British Empire and compare to the end of slavery in America.

 

Materials List:
Documents listed below

 

Documents:
Document 1 - Draft copy of the Emancipation Proclamation http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mal/mal1/172/1723200/001.jpg  http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mal/mal1/208/2082700/001.jpg  http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mal/mal1/208/2082700/002.jpg 

Document 2 - Final copy of the Emancipation Proclamation http://www.archives.gov/exhibit_hall/featured_documents/emancipation_proclamation/transcript.html

Document 3 - WPA oral histories Audio – My grandmother was a slave http://memory.loc.gov/afc/afcqltbr/audio/a003/

Document 4 - Fields interview page 3
http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mesn/161/271264.gif 
(teachers note: other interviews available at: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/snhtml/snhome.html)

Document 5 - Remembering Slavery, African Americans Talk About Their Personal Experiences of Slavery and Emancipation, Radio Documentary and companion book. Edited by Ira Berlin, Marc Favreau and Steven Miller

Document 6 - Print # 3, Writing the Emancipation Proclamation [Etching] http://memory.loc.gov/ndlpcoop/nhnycw/ab/ab01/ab01005r.jpg

Document 7 - EMANCIPATION northern poster
http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/app/3a/3a00000/3a06245t.gif

Document 8 - Journals of the Confederate Congress
http://memory.loc.gov/ll/llcc/000300/03790377.gif 
http://memory.loc.gov/ll/llcc/006/0300/03800378.gif 
http://memory.loc.gov/ll/llcc/006/0400/04880486.gif 
http://memory.loc.gov/ll/llcc/006/0400/04880487.gif 

 

Archival Citations:
Document 1 - Draft copy - Emancipation Proclamation.
The Abraham Lincoln Papers at the Library of Congress http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mal/mal1/172/1723200/001.jpg  http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mal/mal1/208/2082700/001.jpg  http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mal/mal1/208/2082700/002.jpg

Document 2 - Final Copy - Emancipation Proclamation 
The Abraham Lincoln Papers at the Library of Congress http://www.archives.gov/exhibit_hall/featured_documents/emancipation_proclamation/transcript.html

Document 3 - Audio tape
My grandmother was a slave. 
The American Folklife Center, Library of Congress.
http://memory.loc.gov/afc/afcqltbr/audio/a003/ 

Document 4 - Fields interview pg 3.
Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers Project, 1936-1938 http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mesn/161/271264.gif

Document 5 - Remembering Slavery, African Americans Talk About Their Personal Experiences of Slavery and Emancipation, Radio Documentary and companion book. Edited by Ira Berlin, Marc Favreau and Steven Miller

Document 6 - Civil War Treasures from the New-York Historical Society Print # 3, Writing the Emancipation Proclamation [Etching]
http://memory.loc.gov/ndlpcoop/nhnycw/ab/ab01/ab01005r.jpg 

Document 7 - African American Odyssey EMANCIPATION northern poster http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/aaohtml/exhibit/aointro.html

Document 8 - A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation: U.S. Congressional Documents and Debates, 1774-1875
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/amlaw/lwcc.html 

 

Evaluate the Activities:
Student evaluations will be based on written assignments returned to the teacher with emphasis on clarity of student analysis and amount of additional research preformed.

 

Additional Bibliography:
National Archives and Records Administration
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/snhtml/snhome.html  http://memory.loc.gov/service/pnp/cph/3a00000/3a05000/3a05800/3a05802r.jpg  http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mesn/130/337330.gif 

Remembering Slavery, African Americans Talk About Their Personal Experiences of Slavery and Emancipation, Radio Documentary and companion book. Edited by Ira Berlin, Marc Favreau and Steven Miller 1998. NB: this “additional bibliography” has been cited more than once in the body of the plan.